Tag Archive for book reviews

“Six Simple Rules” – A Book Review for a HBR Press Title

If there is one thing that is increasing in the modern working world, this is the entropy. Which has as synonym, among other words, “complexity”. The authors of “Six Simple Rules – How to Manage Complexity Without Getting Complicated” (Yves Morieux and Peter Tollman) have embarked on a journey to do just that. And they accomplished to write a fine book.
Both seniors in the Boston Consulting Group, the authors are seasoned warriors in this “untangling the clients’ businesses” field. This might be just the smallest reason why they embarked on creating a handbook on how to efficiently manage your business from a strategic and de-complexing level. The biggest one is that they seem to be “ideas entrepreneurs” – the kind of persons who see an opportunity to improve things via a new approach or idea – and they just go for it.
And here’s how “Six Simple Rules – How to Manage Complexity Without Getting Complicated” proposes to do: Read more

First Task to Accomplish on Monday Morning

Imagine it is 09:00 AM on a Monday morning. You just landed in your office, supercharged by the Bucks or Republic or another brand coffee. You already had two phone calls with a customer (internal or external). Your task waiting list is longer than the Bible’s first chapter and you do not (want to) know where to begin. So what do you do?
It might look as a joke, but you might start by reading a chapter of a professional book. Research shows that you become 1-2% smarter with every book you read. Your synapses get fired up, your brain starts working and warming up, you get smarter. So why not?

Book review – “Coffee: Growing, Processing, Sustainable Production: A Guidebook for Growers, Processors, Traders, and Researchers” – Editor Jean Nicolas Wintgens

Since quite a while I was looking more and more to something different outside the traditional investments. I played with derivatives based on shares, forex, indices. Yet, recently another area attracted my attention.

Yes, the periodically forgotten and rediscovered treasures of the commodities. They tend to be in fashion and then exit, then enter again into people’s favours. I decided that persistence is the key to success, therefore I started to look more into commodities.

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A Book Review – “Harmonic Trading – Profiting from the Natural Order of the Financial Markets” – volume 2 by Scott M. Carney

Looking at the first volume of “Harmonic Trading” I already arrived at the conclusion that there was something special about it. Maybe the combination of technical analysis precise tools with some interesting applications of mass psychology to trading, maybe the quick and informal style of Scott Carney, who knows… Bottom line, I enjoyed the new twists on the old techniques of “wave trading” or pattern recognition on the tech analysis. Read more

“Technical Analysis: The Complete Resource for Financial Market Technicians” – by Julie R. Dahlquist (Book Review)

Nothing is better than continuous education. And in this respect, we at doitinvest.com did read and review quite a lot of books in the technical analysis field lately. We don’t have any statistics readily availabel, but I suppose that doitinvest.com has become a top reviewer of the trading books and materials published since 2009… 🙂
Now back to work :). I recently got for review one of the books deemed to be a full encyclopedia of techical analysis techniques. So I got quite curious – was it so?

The first look at the book content was quite convincing. The book is very well organized and takes the reader from the basics to the most advanced techniques. It starts with the fundamental assumptions of the technical analysis field – is the random walk theory valid? Are the trends predictable? What is the blend between mass psychology and statistcis which allows you to make money from analysing the markets? What are the main assumptions behind technical analysis and how well do they stand the test of practice? and so on. Read more

A Book Review – “Volatility-Based Technical Analysis” by Kirk Northington

Well, I was looking for a long time after an easier book on technical analysis techniques using a programming language. In other words, I was in for a book where you do not get only the usual lengthy descriptions of various trading techniques and their charts with pointers. After all, it is easy to develop a technique and let it fit with any possible trading – in hindsight.

What I was looking for was a simple way to improve my trading skills and to limit my forex trading risks. If possible, for a book which could be rather practical than conceptual, from which I could learn some code snippets and apply those to trading.

The good news is that there is such a book. “Volatility-Based Technical Analysis: Strategies for Trading the Invisible” by Kirk Northington fills a gap between the individual knowledge of a single trader and the collective wisdom of the large financial institutions. In other words, Northington teaches you how to trade individually using the techniques and the leverages of a large institution. This is a big advantage, especially since the rise of the trading platforms which are so easy to use nowadays online. And where the risk is so high and it is so easy to loose large amounts of money in the blink of an eye 🙂

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A Book Review – “The Only Three Questions You Need to Ask” by Ken Fisher

ken-fisherWell, a book on investing on shares by a Forbes columnist who has more experience than my professional age? Could be interesting, don’t you think?

 

And indeed it was. Ken Fisher writes in a somehow difficult manner. He sidetracks with his three questions back and forth on the same subject. And repeats quite obsessively some of his ideas in the 400+ pages of this project. But at the end of the day I found “The only 3 questions you need to ask” informing and well documented. And full of (arguably) useful insights on shares investing.

 

What is the book about?

 

Well, about investing in shares and about how you can sustainably beat the markets. Read more