best business books

“COLLISION COURSE – Carlos Ghosn and the Culture Wars That Upended an Auto Empire” By Hans Greimel and William Sposato, a HBR Book Essentials

Corporate development happens rarely without conflicts. Nissan’s ascension under Carlos Ghosn goes even beyond that: Ghosn led the Renault-Nissan alliance from a rapid rise to a dramatic fall. “Collision Course” is therefore a tale of money, business and greed – and about the spectacular fall from grace of one of the most different businessmen that ever was out there.

As a veteran automotive reporter, Hans Greimel had a decades-long chance to see how Renault and Nissan evolved during time. He worked in and with Japan for a 15 years, making him almost not only an knowledgeable car connoisseur, but also close to the local rumor mills.  William Sposato wrote almost two decades about the Japanese economy (for Japan Inc.).

“Collision Course” goes beyond the thriller narrative of the rise and fall of Carlos Ghosn. The authors take a much broader view – including the main actors and stakeholders within the story. For example, some important players are the Japanese government representatives, who can barely stand seeing their national car brands being integrated away in a foreign conglomerate.Read More »“COLLISION COURSE – Carlos Ghosn and the Culture Wars That Upended an Auto Empire” By Hans Greimel and William Sposato, a HBR Book Essentials

“Parents Who Lead – The Leadership Approach You Need to Parent wih Purpose, Fuel Your Career and Create a Richer Life” – a HBR Press Book Review

Parents Who Lead

A HBR Press book review by doitinvest.com

Before we become leaders, we are family members. Or is it the other way around? In their new book, Alyssa F. Westring and Stewart D. Friedman take their total leadership concept to a new level. “Parents Who Lead” transfer their Total Leadership concept inversely – from the he private into the worklives. The authors look at our values, what we put first in our private lives – and asknus to transfer this experiwnce in the work hours.
Sounds easy, right? After all, what is so difficult in trying to convince your colleague (who acts like a spoiled toddler) on the necessity of doing a task before all others? And it should be easy to show your boss how great you are when you constantly exceed your sales targets – by giving more than average discounts?

In practice, we are not leaving in an ideal world. And neither are companies. The projects are muddled with uncertainty, markets are changing constantly… And children grow continuously. So all in all, an ever changing game. So how do we stay ahead?
Alyssa F. Westring and Stewart D. Friedman argue that key to this is to persistently pursue the “four-win way” – moving from managing a zero sum game. We are constantly pursuing incremental gains in our lives – trying to do a little extra for our childr n, careers, goals and ourselves. It does not have to be a his way – and “Parents Who Lead” propose several specific tools to achieve this.Read More »“Parents Who Lead – The Leadership Approach You Need to Parent wih Purpose, Fuel Your Career and Create a Richer Life” – a HBR Press Book Review